Ancient Greece

Typical Clothing for Women The typical garment worn by women in Ancient Greece was a long tunic called the peplos. The peplos was a long piece of cloth that was fastened about the waist with a belt. Part of the peplos was folded down over the belt to make it appear as if it was two pieces of clothing.

Especially the cloaking cloth like Chlamys went on to have a huge impression on the societies that donned Christianity as their religions — since famous christian preacher Jesus Christ went on to wear a cloak quite similar to the Greek Chlamy throughout his life.

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And with Greek summers being brutally hot, the less fabric and complicating seams to deal with, the better. Fabrics. The fabrics that the Greeks used for their clothing were sometimes spun in the home (often into a heavy wool material), or made from linen fabric that was imported.
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Linen was also traditionally used for clothing worn during the hot Mediterranean summers. While Greeks today mainly wear modern
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Long, white socks, a sash and pointed shoes called tsarouhia -- topped with their recognizable large pompons -- complete the outfit. On the islands, the men's traditional costume starts with a white undergarment and is layered with baggy pants, known as vraka, a white shirt, a sleeveless coat, a sash, a jacket and a tasseled cap.

Traditional women's clothing in Greece also varies from region to region, but these outfits also contain similar elements. Most traditional costumes for women have a simple cotton dress as a base, with a sleeveless wool vest over it. To this, women may add aprons, sashes and, perhaps most importantly, large head scarves.

One example of a traditional outfit for women is the karagouna. This traditional wedding dress from Central Greece is very colorful and can be quite heavy. Like some other traditional Greek costumes, it includes many layers, starting with a black-fringed white underdress. Clothing in ancient Greece primarily consisted of the chiton , peplos , himation , and chlamys. Ancient Greek men and women typically wore two pieces of clothing draped about the body: Thus, clothes were quite simple, draped, loose-fitting and free flowing.

Customarily, clothing was homemade and cut to various lengths of rectangular linen or wool fabric with minimal cutting or sewing, and secured with ornamental clasps or pins, and a belt, or girdle zone.

Pieces were generally interchangeable between men and women. While no clothes have survived from this period, descriptions exist in contemporary accounts and artistic depictions. Clothes were mainly homemade and locally made since trade with other cultures hadn't occurred yet. Additionally, clothing often served many purposes such as bedding. Linen was the most common fabric due to the hot climate which lasted most of the year. On the rare occasion of colder weather, ancient Greeks wore wool. Common clothing of the time was plain white, or neutral colored, sometimes incorporating decorative borders.

The clothing for both men and women generally consisted of two main parts: The Greeks had a great appreciation for the human body, and it was shown in their fashion.

The fabric was expertly draped around the body, and the cloth could be slightly transparent. Males had no problem with nudity, while women could only be naked in the public bath.

The Greeks also influence modern fashion quite frequently, especially in todays globalized world. Modern big name brands such as Zuhair Murad, Dolce and Gabbana, Gucci, Chanel, and Versace have taken elements from Greek clothing for their ready-to-wear and couture collections today.

Most notably, Gianni Versace famously used Ancient Greek inspiration and motifs in his collection. In fact, his entire branding is based on Greek culture. The logo for Versace is of the Ancient Greek monster Medusa's head encircled in the traditional meander pattern symbolizing eternity. Dolce and Gabbana also did a collection inspired by Greek temples and ruins. In addition to using Greek silhouettes and clothing styles, Chanel staged the show in ancient Greek ruins, providing a theatric and refined experience for their audience.

There have never been more beautiful representations of women. Or more beautiful column. The entire Renaissance, in fact, was based on antiquity.

It is quite evident that, the drapery, architecture, and mythology from ancient Greece had a great influence on fashion since then, and still today. The chiton was a simple tunic garment of lighter linen and usually pleated that was worn by both sexes and all ages.

It consisted of a wide, rectangular tube of material secured along the shoulders and upper arms by a series of fasteners. Often excess fabric would be pulled over a girdle, or belt, which was fastened around the waist see kolpos.

There are two types of chitons — Doric and Ionic, named for their similarities to the Doric and Ionic columns. The Doric chiton is "sleeveless", as sleeve technology had not really been created yet. Usually the Greek children did not wear anything and would stay naked most of the times, especially when they were within the bounds of their houses, which they were for most of the times.

But when they were wearing something, it would be a diaper made up of cloth that would be wrapped around their waists.

It was quite unusual for children to wear full on dressings such as chiton or even footwears. Only once they reached a certain age appropriate for schooling and teaching would they wear other clothes as worn by the adults.

It was a piece of cloth that used to be worn over Peplos or Chiton by people in ancient Greece. It is said to be more popular with the Doric chitons which had no sleeves, and it is an obvious guess that Epiblema used to be more popular among women, especially when they had to stroll outside the comfort of their homes. These epiblema were sewn in different colours and were most frequently donned in the season of fall.

It is also noticeable that Greek who often attended the senate, and other officials associated with the government also used to wear a certain Epiblema during working hours. One would not conventionally associated the practice of wearing a veil in public to the women in ancient Greece. This custom has been more popularly associated with civilizations that have had eastern influences.

But according to a recent study, things could not have been more surprising which states that ancient Greek women routinely wore the veil. Classical Greek and Hellenistic statues sometimes depict Greek women with both their head and face covered By veil. Popular historian Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, who also wrote one of the most detailed books on ancient Greek clothing, states that it was very common for women particularly those with higher status to cover their hair and face in public.

Wearing belts are a common culture among the Greeks. And it was a preferred fashion choice to put on a belt around waist to tuck the chiton. Similarly, a belt could also be fastened around a loose fitting chiton or chiton like dressing, especially around the area of the chest or below it. This sort of belt was quite popular among the women in ancient Greece. And this breast-belt or breast-band referred more often was called the strophion.

In a way, it was the ancient Greek representation of the modern day bra that women are quite used to wearing, except for that Greek women used it as an outside band, in contrast to the modern practice of using it as the innermost layer. Footwears have far older history than the ancient Greek civilization. While versatile and stylish options began to appear in the late Middle Ages, the shoes of ancient Greece were largely utilitarian.

At home, the greek would preferably walk around barefoot, but outside while travelling they would wear leather sandals, a typical footwear known as carbatine. This sandal originated way back during the origin of ancient Greek civilization.

A standard sandal featured a single piece of leather secured to the sole of the foot with laces, which pulled the tops of the shoes together when tied, leaving the toes exposed. This type of footwear was worn until about A.

In addition to the leather sandal, the Greeks also wore a boot like footwear called the Cothurnus. This footwear was also made from leather with red straps in the front.

Clothing in ancient Greece primarily consisted of the chiton, peplos, himation, and chlamys. Ancient Greek men and women typically wore two pieces of clothing draped about the body: an undergarment (chiton or peplos) and a cloak (himation or chlamys). Typical Clothing for Women The typical garment worn by women in Ancient Greece was a long tunic called the peplos. The peplos was a long piece of cloth that was fastened about the waist with a belt. Part of the peplos was folded down over the belt to make it appear as if it was two pieces of clothing. And with Greek summers being brutally hot, the less fabric and complicating seams to deal with, the better. Fabrics. The fabrics that the Greeks used for their clothing were sometimes spun in the home (often into a heavy wool material), or made from linen fabric that was imported.